Icons and Wallflowers

Ali

Life is like a sporting event. Being born in the moment, it is a platform, and as actors on a stage we can make it as we want it. Telling a story, it is this that we communicate to the world, with either clarity or static. Being both the narrator and the protagonist in our own drama, there is much to convey, but where are we to be found? In the light or in the dark?

Having both participants and spectators, this divide in the game of life is what separates those in power from those who disavow it. To be powerful is to be in the game dictating play, making a difference, and forging a legacy. Those in the game are examples, and the shining lights for those who tread tenderly on the sidelines waiting for their turn which may or may not come as they hesitate to move.

Wanting to play a meaningful role, but vague in their intent, it is fear, uncertainty and doubt that makes voyeurs of those who were born to be heroes. With the mythological hero being the one who rises up out of adversity to discover their greatness, it is our light that we make obscure when we allow fear, uncertainty and doubt to drive our actions. Making us unconfident and timid, we become weary of so much that in a position of strength, we would not dither to move towards.

Perceiving as threatening the criticism and disapproval which others may throw our way, this is what we allow to become the proverbial dragon that breathes fire in the direction of our dreams. Scorching the seed of our potential, it is our gifting and ambition that remain untapped. Neglecting our spirit in this process, it is the world that is deprived of the opportunity to see what it could be through our presence.

There are two types of people in this world: icons and wallflowers. A wallflower is a spectator who chooses to watch, rather than participate in the game of life. Forming a part of the crowd, they become but a blur in the sea of faces that know not what they stand for. Unsure of whether to cheer or jeer, it is not out of love that they act, but out of self-preservation. Idolising those that affirm who they desire to be, and criticizing those who exhibit their own shortcomings, they are not unbiased or credible observers. Fuelled not by passion and inspiration, but by the anger and bitterness that arise from the frustration of potential, they warn as they teach of the perils of the half-lived life.

An icon, on the other hand, is a player on the field of dreams. Guided by the call of their heart, it is not on the fringes that they sit, for what they realise is that the true gifts of life move to those who are guided by the spirit in all that they do. Clear and confident in what they understand their purpose to be, it is this that they take action to manifest, despite the protestations of the tribe that surrounds them. Cultivating their inner life, these icons don’t become victims of external pressures which claim those who do not know themselves in the light of love. Called to express their true self, this is what they reveal to others, and with the generosity of spirit they give of themselves wholly to serve and benefit others who they recognise as kindred spirits on this journey of life.

Brilliant as a spectacle, life is even more glorious in its experience. To experience is to participate in, and as the most powerful lessons are learned as we make conscious contact with that which is the source of our teaching, so is that richness what eludes us when we stand uncommitted on the edge of the dance floor. With life being the dance itself, it is the role of dancer that we are called to fill. Inspired by our authentic song, we cannot go wrong, even though we may take a misstep on occasion. Each of us can be icons for the world when our seed of greatness is allowed to take root, and blossom in a way that the flower which fear, uncertainty and doubt have painted on the wall of our mind cannot.

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